Conciliarism in Nicholas of Cusa
Read Online
Share

Conciliarism in Nicholas of Cusa

  • 690 Want to read
  • ·
  • 61 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Nicholas, -- of Cusa, Cardinal, -- 1401-1464,
  • Church -- Authority.,
  • Councils and synods -- History.,
  • Conciliar theory.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementBill H. Pruett.
SeriesCanon law studies
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination52 leaves.
Number of Pages52
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18058100M

Download Conciliarism in Nicholas of Cusa

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Nicholas of Cusa ( – 11 August ), also referred to as Nicholas of Kues and Nicolaus Cusanus (/ k j uː ˈ s eɪ n ə s /), was a German philosopher, theologian, jurist, and of the first German proponents of Renaissance humanism, he made spiritual and political contributions in European history.A notable example of this is his mystical or spiritual writings on "learned Alma mater: Heidelberg University, University of Padua. Nicholas of Cusa and Early Modern Reform sheds new light on Cusanus’ relationship to early modernity by focusing on the reform of church, the reform of theology, the reform of perspective, and the reform of method – which together aim to encompass the breadth and depth of Cusanus’ own reform initiatives. In particular, in examining the way in which he served as inspiration for a wide and. Nicholas of Cusa argued for a church, which balanced hierarchy with consent of the church as a whole. The Council of Basel (–) tried to impose reform on pope and curia. This produced a papalist reaction led by Pope Eugenius IV (–) and the Dominican theologian John Torquemada. Nicholas of Kues ( – 11 August ), also referred to as Nicolaus Cusanus and Nicholas of Cusa, was a German philosopher, theologian, jurist, and of the first German proponents of Renaissance humanism, he made spiritual and political contributions in European history.A notable example of this is his mystical or spiritual writings on "learned ignorance," as well as his.

Nicholas of Cusa () was active during the Renaissance, developing adventurous ideas even while serving as a churchman. The book places Nicholas into his times but also looks at his later reception. The first part addresses institutional issues, including Schism, conciliarism, indulgences and the possibility of dialogue with Muslims. Representation and Authority: Cardinal Cesarini and Cusa's Concordantia, Gerald Christianson; Nicholas of Cusa, on presidential authority in a general council, H. Lawrence Bond, Gerald Christianson and Thomas M. Izbicki; Nicholas of Cusa and the presidency debate at the Council of Basel, , Gerald Christianson; Cusanus, Cesarini, and the. Start studying Nicholas of Cusa (Conciliarism & other "Northern events). Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. 1. James E. Biechler, "Nicholas of Cusa and the End of the Conciliar Movement: A Humanist Crisis of Identity," Church History 44 (): 6. 2. The selection of the site for reunification talks was in fact a contest over whether pope or council would control the proceedings and the outcome. The pope, responding to the.

Description. Nicholas of Cusa and Times of Transition is an edited volume comprising twenty essays that discuss and reflect on the historical context, ideas, and legacy of Nicholas of Cusa (). The first part of the book includes essays addressing institutional issues in the Latin Church, including Schism, conciliarism, indulgences, and the possibility of dialogue with Muslims. Nicholas of Cusa's emphasis on the intellect in salvation is controversial because it appears to privilege the mind over the body, undermine the goodness of creation, and ignore the place of repentance from sin in salvation. In short, Nicholas of Cusa's doctrine of theosis reveals the .   This book is one of many translations that are currently being made for English language readers on the 15th century writings of Nicholas of Cusa. New translations of Cusanus writings began to appear in the late s by Jasper Hopkins of the University of s: 8. In addressing not only the Conciliarist controversy of his day but issues of civil and ecclesiastical government and challenges to the Church, from reform movements to the division between Catholic and Orthodox traditions, Nicholas of Cusa (–64) continues to provoke responses.